Lexus IS200 starter motor brush repair

This procedure is relevant to other Toyota planetary gear starters.

The exact factory procedure is under Starter Components in the TSRM

Symptoms of the problem:

  • No tick, tack from the starter solenoid when turning the key.
  • Tapping the starter with a stick while turning the key agitates the starter enough to start.

The starter solenoid has 1 power and 2 grounds: one ground to the body of the starter, and one ground through the starter motor. Both grounds need to be connected for the electromagnetic solenoid to pull in.

The problem is not with the solenoid itself, but with the grounding through the starter. This can be verified by:

  • Disconnecting the high current input to the solenoid input post
  • Disconnecting the link between the solenoid output post and the starter motor
  • Connecting ground to the solenoid output post
  • Connecting ground to the starter assembly body

Then power the solenoid signal +12v, it should pull in reliably every time.

Tapping the starter with a stick agitates the motor brushes to make better contact on the commutator, making a better ground through the motor. Based on these symptoms the brushes or commutator in the starter motor are worn out.

Pull the starter and dissassemble:

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Usually we start by taking the other end off, but here we can see the brushes are 100% finished. 2 barely protrude from the brush holders. Where did they go? That pile of graphite tells the story.

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The commutator is scored and filled with worn graphite. I wasn’t sure if this would be reusable.

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Cleaned off and sanded it down

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The minimum service specification is 27.0mm. This one is OK to be reused.

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Here’s the brush holder end. The brush holder assembly is replaceable and can be ordered from Toyota. This is for a 1999 IS200 with a 0.8kw starter. If yours is different check the catalogue

  • 1x 28140-70020 HOLDER ASSY, STARTER BRUSH
  • 2x 28142-70020 STARTER KIT (these are the negative brushes)

The brush holder assembly contains the positive brushes. The negative brushes are separate and have to be crimped on to posts on the field body. Details of this whole job are in the service manual.

MX83 Toyota strut top bearings

This is regarding Toyota P/N 48609-22070 (factory Toyota only) strut mounts.

The bearings are a Nachi 6302 without seals. Nachi also make a sealed version

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I have no idea if they have a retaining compound on them, but if you know what you’re doing they should be replaceable. If yours are knocking or creaking replacing the bearings would be an economical alternative to getting new mounts.

MX83 Cressida starter solenoid contacts

My starter solenoid contacts wore out. Here is info for a Cressida/Crown/Supra with a denso starter.

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Although the denso starter solenoids are fairly common, I wanted to make sure I was ordering the right parts. Many rebuild kits on ebay and amazon are vague in their application list, and vague is never good.

I checked my part number of my starter solenoid as 28150-41060 as used on 5M, 6M, 7M, RZ engines. As I couldn’t find a rebuild kit listing exactly that part number, I took it apart and here are the dimensions I measured:

  • ~20.65mm Plunger body diameter
  • ~36.8mm Plunger ring contact diameter
  • ~96.65mm Overall rod length including top hat
  • 8mm diameter terminal posts outside the body of the solenoid
  • Extended wing (‘C’ shape) contacts – ~21.5 mm wide. Type 1 on the photo below:

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This is valid for 28150-41060 only. If yours is a different P/N I encourage you to measure it – you need to take it apart anyway. When getting a kit, make sure to get one that includes a plunger, as the ring on it is a wearing contact too.

There are 2 part numbers on the Toyota diagram!

If there are 2 or more part numbers for one part on your Toyota diagram, marked with a ※ (the x with dots means reference mark), look for a legend to explain further. Sometimes it’s on the next page. Different trim levels and equipment specification are fitted with different parts, usually this is made clear in the legend or part name.

However, sometimes you find something like this:

toyotaparts2

… Without an accompanying explanation. At first I thought it was a range of chassis numbers, but they’re actually date codes in the form YYMM. I don’t know how Toyota aligns the change over, so ask your parts guy if you need to.

It took me a little while to figure out, so now you know.